Magic City Question: A new grocery store downtown? No, not yet

09.25.2007 by André Natta · → 6 Comments

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It’s been a while since Torme’s doors closed in Birmingham’s city center, taking away the area’s only immediate grocery option. While stores like The Neighborhood Market fill portions of the growing downtown population’s needs, many still long for a “major” grocery store to serve the needs of area loft dwellers and small business owners.

Many had placed hope in reports saying that Publix was considering locations downtown. Well, this morning’s Birmingham News reports that we’ll just have to wait a little longer as the Lakeland, FL-based chain has decided to not move forward on two potential locations. Developers say there are other options; what would your choice be?

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Filed under: 35203 · Alabama · Birmingham · Business · Magic City Question

6 comments
DJ
DJ

This is sad. I saw that this morning and wanted to cry. Downtown Birmingham is on the cusp of transformation, and one of the last missing catalysts for massive transition is this. The population is there. I agree wholeheartedly with Dystopos on the tria and V Richards angle...I think the piece s/he is missing is the UAB draw, particularly after they install the walkbridge to the new park across the railroad tracks. Then all three contingents can be serviced, with the bulk of the options via foot if public transport isn't fixed.

DJ
DJ

This is sad. I saw that this morning and wanted to cry. Downtown Birmingham is on the cusp of transformation, and one of the last missing catalysts for massive transition is this. The population is there. I agree wholeheartedly with Dystopos on the tria and V Richards angle...I think the piece s/he is missing is the UAB draw, particularly after they install the walkbridge to the new park across the railroad tracks. Then all three contingents can be serviced, with the bulk of the options via foot if public transport isn't fixed.

Deon Gordon
Deon Gordon

Perhaps, this is a good time for Bruno's to consider how opening a downtown/midtown location could give them a unique edge over the competition and provide them with the solid hometown footing they've been desperately seeking since the takeover. Building an urban location could, quite possibly, make a very powerful impression among Birmingham shoppers which, I imagine, would help the chain increase its local market share.

Deon Gordon
Deon Gordon

Perhaps, this is a good time for Bruno's to consider how opening a downtown/midtown location could give them a unique edge over the competition and provide them with the solid hometown footing they've been desperately seeking since the takeover. Building an urban location could, quite possibly, make a very powerful impression among Birmingham shoppers which, I imagine, would help the chain increase its local market share.

Dystopos
Dystopos

I think Tria and V. Richard's have the right products. They just need a site with enough draw and accessibility that they can pull office workers for lunch as well as loft residents for shopping. I doubt that's in downtown right now, because a significant part of the customer base will want to drive. Seems like midtown or Pepper Place offer the most flexibility while remaining within a 5 or 6 block walk from the loft district.

Dystopos
Dystopos

I think Tria and V. Richard's have the right products. They just need a site with enough draw and accessibility that they can pull office workers for lunch as well as loft residents for shopping. I doubt that's in downtown right now, because a significant part of the customer base will want to drive. Seems like midtown or Pepper Place offer the most flexibility while remaining within a 5 or 6 block walk from the loft district.