On-street parking rates go up in Birmingham’s city center

11.12.2014 by André Natta · → 6 Comments

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time-out-on-metersRecently there have been many more comments made via online networks like Facebook and Twitter about a seemingly sudden and significant rise in on-street parking rates in Birmingham’s city center. The rates were last raised in 2009, though city officials admitted the changes hadn’t widely gone into effect nearly a year later. Current reports show meter rates have risen to $0.25 for 8 minutes — an increase included in the city’s 2015 municipal budget.

Fees for city owned parking lots have risen at this time and they may be seeing some increased usage as a result of the unavailability of spaces under Interstate 20/59 adjacent to the BJCC complex. The following is a quick round-up of parking meter and city-owned parking deck fees from cities either visited as part of the then Birmingham Regional Chamber of Commerce’s BIG Trip (as has been done on this site previously) and those currently referenced as peer cities in the Birmingham Business Alliance’s Blueprint Birmingham document for the purposes of comparison.

City Meter Fee Parking Deck/Lot Fee
Birmingham $0.50/16 minutes $1/hour ($8 daily maximum)*
Baltimore, MD $0.50/30 minutes $5-7/hour (avg. $20 maximum)
Charlotte, NC $0.50/30 minutes $3-6/hour (avg. $20 maximum)
Nashville, TN $0.50/20 minutes $5-8/hour ($10/12 daily maximum)
Pittsburgh, PA $1.50/30 minutes $5/hour ($11-16 daily maximum)
Denver, CO  $0.50/30 minutes $1-4/hour ($12 daily maximum)
Austin, TX $0.50/30 minutes $4/hour ($13 daily maximum)

Louisville, KY $0.75/30 minutes $2/hour ($10 daily maximum)
Memphis, TN $0.50/30 minutes $3-5 flat rate
Raleigh, NC $0.50/30 minutes $2/hour ($12 daily maximum)
Oklahoma City, OK $0.50/30 minutes $2/hour ($10 daily maximum)
Atlanta, GA $1.00/30 minutes $4/hour ($10 daily maximum)
Huntsville, AL $0.25/30 minutes $0.50/hour ($4 daily maximum)
Montgomery, AL $0.50/30 minutes $1/hour ($6 daily maximum)
Mobile, AL $0.50/30 minutes $5 flat rate

Morris Avenue Parking Lot Sept 2014NOTE: All on-street metered rates listed above are for that city’s central business district area.

There were some interesting findings as the research was conducted. While there are several parking deck options in Nashville, there are only two municipally owned options in their city center; this would be why the rates included may seem lower than what’s typically encountered while there. It played out that way in several of the cities referenced.  Many of the peer cities had also created interactive sites allowing potential customers to know about availability in parking decks. Additionally, it was determined that it’s really difficult to find rates posted online for metered parking in Alabama cities. One question that still remains though based on the necessary shifting of parking options — why does the western end of the Morris Avenue lot still look like this most days?

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6 comments
gnosticmike
gnosticmike

It appears that a possible answer to your, "One question that still remains though based on the necessary shifting of parking options — why does the western end of the Morris Avenue lot still look like this most days?" , is that the lot is not on a bus line that would seed possible shoppers / workers to and from that lot to respective businesses.


The bus lines that go near it are at least two blocks away (or more), buses that do go near it do not run until 10AM or so, and no current corporation or private bus option has presented itself to shuttle those workers that would be potentially parking there at thT part of Morris Avenue. People just don't want to walk a few blocks from there to their final destination for their own personal reasons. There is opportunity there to pick up the slack.

Dystopos
Dystopos

Someone posted a link to Birmingham, Michigan's municipal parking website in a previous discussion on FB. It looked amazingly sophisticated compared to ours.

bhamterminal
bhamterminal

@WesleyVaughn the comparison was made with the CBDs of those cities in close proximity to their municipal centers,